Gestational Diabetes Screening: Glucose Challenge Screening Test

Glucose Challenge Screening is a standard test performed to check for gestational diabetes, a temporary form of hyperglycemia.

Glucose Challenge Screening Test is usually done during the 26th to the 28th week of pregnancy.

No preparation and no fasting is required for the Glucose Challenge Screening Test, and it can be done at any time of the day.

During the test, the woman is asked to consume a sweet drink containing 50 grams of glucose. One hour later a blood sample is taken to see how sugar is absorbed by the body.

A high level of glucose in your blood (140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) and over) means that your body is not processing sugar properly. It is called a positive result, and it may be indicative of high risk of gestational diabetes.

Women with positive tests are usually advised to take the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT), as it provides more accurate results.

Negative test results (less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L)) indicate normal blood levels and do not require further testing.

 

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Comments

  1. Raksha
    July 6th, 2011| 11:08 am

    While diet and exercise are the mainstays of treating GDM, there are not a lot of concrete studies indicating that one way is best for anyone. While it has been popular in the past to place women with GDM on restrictive diets, particularly caloric intake, ACOG now advises that this may not be desirable. In fact, they state quite clearly that even if one chooses to restrict caloric intake no more than 33% of the calories should be removed from the woman’s diet.

  2. Rashi
    July 6th, 2011| 11:09 am

    It is a normal function of pregnancy for the digestion to slow down and for the body to become more resistant to insulin. This is beneficial to baby, because it helps the body extract more nutrition and more energy (glucose) from the mother’s food. The placenta is supposed to create extra amounts of certain hormones in order to help this process and nourish the baby more efficiently. Increased insulin resistance in pregnancy is normal.
    http://www.chemistdirect.co.uk/accu-chek_v_102.html

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